Category: Runway

25
May

10 Designers From Pratt Institute’s Class of 2020 Share Their Work—And Their Thoughts on Change

Graduation collections from Pratt Institute Class of 2020
Graduation collections from Pratt Institute, Class of 2020 Photos: Courtesy of the designers

None of the usual appointments to review students’ graduation collections could take place this year. Seeing their work is always a highlight of the spring for me; they’re so full of hope, to say nothing of the fact that they’re often exploring issues that are only discussions in the wider industry. These are the creatives who will be leading fashion into the future.

Though the class of 2020 will have to do without the rites of graduation, the 10 members of Pratt Institute’s graduating class I communicated with seemed positive and resilient—that’s not to say that they are wearing rose-colored glasses. They’re committed to sweeping change, and they share a sense of responsibility to make it happen. The issues that are most important to them are sustainability, diversity, gender, and technology. They believe in the importance of personal narrative, community, and craft. And while they might dream big, most are thinking about small-scale endeavors.

Congratulations to Pratt Institute’s class of 2020. Meet 10 of them, here.

pRy Arne Pratt Institutep
Ry Arne, Pratt InstitutePhoto: Courtesy of the designer

pRy Arne Pratt Institutep
Ry Arne, Pratt InstitutePhoto: Courtesy of the designer

Ry Arne, 22, from Springfield, Missouri
What is your mission?
To explore what clothes can be and how they can liberate gender expression. My graduate collection came from a personal exploration of gender identity and childhood fantasy. I wanted to create my own personal dress-up collection inspired by my childhood dreams of playing a princess and my desire and interest in having a flat chest.

How does the industry need to change to move forward?
Fashion needs to look at the groups of people it currently excludes. It’s an art form we all participate in, and the clothes need to reflect that. Now more than ever is a great time to dissolve binary-based clothing and explore what possibilities that opens up for the medium itself and for those who wish to participate and express themselves with it.

pCornelia Borgerhoff Pratt Institutep
Cornelia Borgerhoff, Pratt InstitutePhoto: Courtesy of the designer

Cornelia Borgerhoff, 22, from Philadelphia
What is your mission in fashion?
I am a young black woman who grew up in a predominately white environment. Through my work, I give myself permission to break down some of the more complicated experiences of my past. [My mission is] connecting people through art. I want my audience to view the stories within my work and from there, hopefully, see others, or themselves, in a new light.

How does the industry need to change to move forward?
It needs to showcase more voices. Designers of color need to be seen, and not just because they are fulfilling some diversity quota. Designing clothes for the sake of it is not enough anymore. By giving a bigger platform to diverse voices, I think the industry could reach far more people.

pXinzi Cui Pratt Institutep
Xinzi Cui, Pratt InstitutePhoto: Courtesy of the designer

pXinzi Cui Pratt Institutep
Xinzi Cui, Pratt InstitutePhoto: Courtesy of the designer

Xinzi Cui, 25, from Beijing

What is your mission in fashion?
To learn the essence from the past and apply it to future development. We should focus more on the sustainability of the future fashion industry by cooperating with technology.

How does the industry need to change to move forward?
I believe that small-scale workshops should be one of the major developments in the future of fashion. From the perspective of design, styling and creativity would still be a priority. Meanwhile, we could also focus on function and durability of the product with the help of technology.

pJuliana Gogol Pratt Institutep
Juliana Gogol, Pratt InstitutePhoto: Courtesy of the designer

Juliana Gogol, 22, from Kansas City, Missouri
What is your mission in fashion?
I aim to provide a sense of comfort for the wearer. Much of my work focuses on feelings of nostalgia, familiarity, and finding a home as well as the exploration of domestic material processes like hand-weaving, knitting, dyeing, and embroidery. I believe that the more time is spent creating a garment, the more good feeling and energy is eventually passed on to the wearer.

How does the industry need to change to move forward?
To encourage “slow fashion” via a renaissance of people engaging with fashion in a more hands-on way. Most people see a $200 jacket and don’t see the research, design development, or hours and hours of skilled craftwork that went into it. Perhaps a meaningful way to “slow down” the fashion system would be to raise consumer awareness of the process and people involved in making the clothes they buy, or even to facilitate consumer participation via D.I.Y. modifications or styling choices. In other times of crisis, we’ve seen everyday people making their own clothes, planting their own gardens, and making do with what they have—why not now?

pOlivia Rose Harris Pratt Institutep
Olivia Rose Harris, Pratt InstitutePhoto: Courtesy of the designer

pOlivia Rose Harris Pratt Institutep
Olivia Rose Harris, Pratt InstitutePhoto: Courtesy of the designer

Olivia Rose Harris, 22, from Sanibel Island, Florida
What is your mission in fashion?
To dress the world in head-to-toe, unconventional knitwear. As a “women’s craft” historically, knitting goes hand in hand with the stories I tell.

 

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08
Feb

Will the Oscars Crush New York Fashion Week?

A scheduling conflict for the fashion ages.

Jason Wu, with this models, after his spring 2020 runway show in September.
Jason Wu, with this models, after his spring 2020 runway show in September.
Credit: Vincent Tullo for The New York Times

By Jessica Testa

As New York Fashion Week approached, so too did the insider drama of the show calendar. Which designers are skipping this season? Who is switching cities at the last minute? Who is left?

One conflict on the schedule stands apart: The 92nd Academy Awards, one of the most high-profile fashion events of the year, are on Sunday, right in the middle of fashion week.

The overlap is an anomaly; the awards show is scheduled two weeks earlier than usual in 2020 and will revert to late February next year. But it means that this year, many red carpet designers are pulling double duty, and that front-row seats reserved for A-list clients at the runway shows may be harder to fill.

It’s another complication in an already complicated season for the Council of Fashion Designers of America, which manages the New York Fashion Week calendar.

In an email, Steven Kolb, the chief executive of the CFDA, said that when his organization learned of the conflict, it “took initiative to have an open dialogue with designers” about their time slots, “in order to best support them.” He said the global spotlight of the Oscars red carpet “complements NYFW.”

For the red carpet designers who have decided to show in New York, preparing for both events simultaneously has been “a juggling act,” said Mark Badgley, of the label Badgley Mischka. “A roller coaster,” James Mischka said.

The two designers have been zipping nominees into elegant beaded gowns for more than 20 years. They spoke to The New York Times on a hectic morning eight days before their runway show and nine days before the awards. Several models were due soon for fittings.

“You’re looking at your sewing machines and weighing out, ‘Does that machine go to an Oscar dress, or does it do a runway sample?’” Mr. Badgley said.

At that moment, they were working on two gowns for the Academy Awards. That’s nothing compared with the 30 to 50 looks they present on a runway during any given season. Still, these two red carpet gowns — if they survive the last-minute celebrity mind changing and actually make it to the Oscars — could attract more attention from the general public than a fashion show.

Yet shows still matter to many designers. In an email, Brandon Maxwell, who dressed Lady Gaga, Melissa McCarthy and Sarah Paulson at the 2019 Oscars, said that “from a business and brand perspective NYFW is the priority, so we are focusing our efforts and resources there.” His show is scheduled the night before the awards.

At one point, the best way for designers to draw attention to a runway show was to put celebrities in their front row. This, too, has become difficult with the overlapping calendar, especially for labels whose shows are scheduled closest to the Oscars.

(The Badgley Mischka, show will end more than 24 hours before red carpet coverage begins, so the designers have it easier than others. Still, it is not ideal; because of the show’s proximity to the awards, its 2020 invite list focuses more on New York-based V.I.P.s than in years past.)

“I would be very concerned if I was one of those designers,” said Jessica Morgan of the celebrity fashion blog Go Fug Yourself, referring to the shows scheduled during the Oscars coverage. Ms. Morgan spent about a decade covering fashion week for New York magazine and Cosmopolitan. Awards season is her website’s biggest traffic period of the year.

“For one thing, you’re not going to have any celebrities there — maybe a few, but not anyone big,” she said. “And no big stylists are going to be able to attend their show because they’re going to be putting clients in Oscar or Vanity Fair Oscar party outfits.”

One designer scheduled for Sunday evening is Jason Wu, a celebrity favorite. (Mr. Wu declined to comment for this article.) Otherwise, the CFDA appears to have worked around fashion week’s big names. Prabal Gurung has shown on Sunday evening for the last four seasons; this year, he has been moved to Tuesday evening.

Others showing Sunday night include the street wear label Palm Angels; the futuristic swimwear-and-more label Chromat; and Kim Shui, who has dressed Kylie Jenner and Cardi B. Those designers may not be as disappointed as one might expect. Ms. Shui doesn’t care that her show is scheduled for 8 p.m., when the Oscars ceremony begins. The audiences are “different,” she said.

“We do have some front-row guests who might not be able to make it on the same day, but for us that’s not important,” said Ms. Shui, whose front row in the past has included Kehlani and Azealia Banks. “The people that would be coming to our show would be coming to our show anyway.”

Last season was more of a problem, she said, when her show was scheduled at the same time as the monster Savage x Fenty show. Diverse models Ms. Shui likes to cast were already booked by Rihanna, the Fenty designer.

A few years ago Badgley Mischka was scheduled at the same time as the Super Bowl, a considerably less fashion-centric event than the Oscars but nevertheless one that some of the designers’ guests — namely the presidents of retail companies — didn’t want to miss. So they put on their runway show at halftime and turned the game on backstage.

nytimes.com

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02
Apr
Couture capsule collections are now officially a thing following Dior’s
stunning restaging of their spring 2018 couture show in Shanghai this week.
FASHIONWEEKDAILY.COM

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17
Sep
Highlights from the shows, including a celebrity-packed front row at Calvin Klein and a trek to
Bedford Hills, N.Y., to see Ralph Lauren’s vintage cars.
NYTIMES.COM

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14
Sep

Models Talk: Racism, Abuse and Feeling Old at 25

For decades, modeling was the silent profession. But not any longer. In interviews with The New York Times, young women discuss racism, sexual abuse and the fashion industry’s obsession with extreme youth.
NYTIMES.COM

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04
Sep
NYFW: The Shows returns to Skylight Clarkson Sq this September 7 – 13.

See the full designer lineup and schedule: bit.ly/NYFWSept2017#NYFW

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05
Oct
To keep up with ‘instant fashion,’ fashion creatives — from photographers to casting directors to visual merchandisers — are changing the way they operate.
BUSINESSOFFASHION.COM

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23
Sep
On Friday, September 23, Fashion Group International of Minneapolis-St. Paul (FGI-MSP) will host its “Fall: Into Luxury” fashion show at Morrie’s Luxury Auto in Golden Valley. The event will showcase autumn looks from local boutiques,…
ARTFULLIVINGMAGAZINE.COM

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20
Sep

New York Fashion Week in 60 Seconds | Spring/Summer 2017

 
T magazine’s market director, Malina Joseph Gilchrist, recaps the collections from New York.
NYTIMES.COM|BY JORDAN FULLER

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17
Sep
A roundup of the top 22 trends, ideas, and styling tricks we loved from the spring 2017 shows
at New York Fashion Week.
INSTYLE.COM

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